Tennessee History

TENNESSEE HISTORY 1

TennesseeHistory

Tennessee was a Southern state infamous for the proliferation of theslave trade. President Abraham Lincoln had passed legislation thatoutlawed the practice in the U.S. In protest, Tennessee chose tosecede from the Union. Although many residents preferred to remainpart of the Union, the preference for slave trade caused changes inattitude (Hale &amp Merritt, 2013). In this essay, I will prove thatblacks in Tennessee played a fundamental role in the end of slaverysince they were committed to protecting their human dignity.

Slavery in Tennessee was abolished to allow blacks the right to enjoybasic civil liberties. The military governor, Andrew Johnson, wasforced to free his personal slaves in 1863 after the Confederatesoldiers failed to vanquish the Union forces. Nevertheless, Johnsonfreed all slaves in the state in 1864 (Hale &amp Merritt, 2013).Tennessee was the first of the Southern states to return to the Unionand ratify the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution(Hale &amp Merritt, 2013). Notably, secular religion motivatedAfrican Americans to fight for their rights. In particular, manyblacks were empowered to learn that humans were created equal andthat slavery was unjustifiable (Hale &amp Merritt, 2013).Admittedly, there were differing mentalities among African Americansin the three Grand Divisions. Some blacks viewed slavery as unjustwhile others considered it as a common phenomenon that could not bealtered. Eventually, sustained pressure from the disillusioned slavesled to the end of slavery.

The Civil War subjected the blacks in Tennessee to tumultuousexperiences. Many African Americans had to persevere through inhumaneliving conditions. In fact, slaves were subjected to harsh labor ininclement weather (Hale &amp Merritt, 2013). The masters in workingfarms used physical torture to gain complete control over theirslaves. Black families were torn apart and sent to differentplantations to undermine their willpower. Furthermore, food resourceswere scarce and prevented black workers from deriving sufficientnourishment (Hale &amp Merritt, 2013). Such experiences dehumanizedAfrican Americans in the state. In addition, blacks in Tennessee wereprohibited from occupying public office (Hale &amp Merritt, 2013)s.African Americans neither had voting nor ownership rights.Consequently, the blacks in Tennessee were unable to enjoy privilegessimilar to those of whites.

During the Reconstruction, the blacks in Tennessee made major stridestowards emancipation from slave trade. In this regard, they createdseveral institutions designed to fight for their freedom. Thetransition to emancipation of slaves began during the Civil War asblack communities were established. Most of the institutions thatwere formed comprised of churches and schools. For example, theJubilee Hall of Fisk University in Nashville was constructed toenable blacks to receive higher education (Hale &amp Merritt, 2013).The First Beale Street Baptist Church was also constructed in Memphisto provide spiritual strength to African American residents (Hale &ampMerritt, 2013). Blacks in Tennessee continued to hold annualEmancipation Day festivals designed to celebrate the end of slaveryin the state. In 1872, Sampson Keeble was recognized as the firstAfrican American citizen to be elected to the state’s House ofRepresentatives (Hale &amp Merritt, 2013). Consequently, blacks inTennessee made tremendous progress that led to prosperity andemancipation from slave trade.

Indeed, African Americans in Tennessee contributed to the end ofslavery as they wanted to safeguard their human dignity. In thisregard, blacks established various institutions designed to servetheir interests. Churches and schools were formed to cater for theAfrican Americans in the state. Emancipation Day festivals were alsoheld annually to commemorate their emancipation from slave trade.Religion contributed to the end of slavery through its teachings ofequality and the sanctity of human life. Andrew Johnson emancipatedall slaves in Tennessee after sustained pressure from blacks and theUnion soldiers.

Reference

Hale, W. T., &amp Merritt, D. L. (2013). History of Tennessee andTennesseans. New York, NY: Book On Demand Limited.

Tennessee History

TENNESSEE HISTORY 1

TennesseeHistory

Tennessee was the state in which the most major battles occurredduring the American Civil War (Hale &amp Merritt, 2013). PresidentAbraham Lincoln fostered the war to prevent against secession ofstates from the union (Hale &amp Merritt, 2013). Some regions of thecountry were supportive of slave trade yet others preferred to endthe barbaric practice. Lincoln passed legislation that outlawed theownership of slaves. In this essay, I will show that Tennessee playedthe most important role in the war since it had rich farmlands thatbenefited both Union and Confederate armies.

Tennessee was noteworthy due to several factors. Firstly, it was thelast of the Southern states to leave the union despite the fact thatmany people preferred to stay. Secondly, Tennessee had many riversthat acted as arteries to the Deep South (Hale &amp Merritt, 2013).The state was considered a prize to Union and Confederate soldiersbecause it had fertile farmlands that nourished both armies (Hale &ampMerritt, 2013). Furthermore, Tennessee had critical transportationroutes that were crucial to trading activities. Some of theconfrontations key to the fall of Tennessee included the Battle ofShiloh that led to many deaths of Confederate soldiers. Other majorbattles that led to the victory of Union forces were fought atFranklin, Nashville, Chattanooga, and Stones River (Hale &ampMerritt, 2013). Notably, these confrontations resulted in massivebloodshed as Confederate soldiers were forced to surrender.Confederate Civil War leaders included Nathan Bedford, Leonidas Polk,Benjamin Cheatham, and Alexander Stewart while Union leaders wereSamuel Carter, James Spears, and William Campbell (Hale &ampMerritt, 2013). Reconstruction was a tremendous success since itallowed Tennessee to regain its economic and social welfare after thedevastation caused by the Civil War.

Indeed, Tennessee had the most significant role in the war since thestate had enough food resources to cater for both Confederate andUnion armies. The majority of battles were fought in the state incomparison to other counties since armies wanted control ofresources.

Reference

Hale, W. T., &amp Merritt, D. L. (2013). History of Tennessee andTennesseans. New York, NY: Book On Demand Limited.